1 John 4:20-21 (NLT)
20 If someone says, �I love God,� but hates a Christian brother or sister, that person is a liar; for if we don�t love people we can see, how can we love God, whom we cannot see? 21 And he has given us this command: Those who love God must also love their Christian brothers and sisters.

The Greek word miseo is used for hate. It means to hate, pursue with hatred, detest. The Apostle John tells us a person cannot both love God and hate another Christian who has the essence of God living in them. He says those who love God must also love their fellow Christian�s.

Thomas Jefferson and John Adams were both Founding Fathers of America and both believed in God and the Christian faith. They were both born on the same day and died on the same day. At one point the two men went from being good friends to becoming bitter rivals. There were long periods of silence between the two men in which they remained estranged from each other. Benjamin Rush, a Founding Father, a devote Christian and a friend to both Jefferson and Adams, helped reconcile the two men. Prior to the reconciliation of Jefferson and Adams, John Adams wrote the following to Rush, �My friend, there is something very serious in this business. The Holy Ghost carries on the whole Christian system in this earth. Not a baptism, not a marriage, not a sacrament can be administered but by the Holy Ghost, Who is transmitted from age to age by laying the hands of the Bishop on the heads of candidates for the ministry. . . . There is no authority, civil or religious � there can be no legitimate government � but what is administered by this Holy Ghost. There can be no salvation without it � all without it is rebellion and perdition, or, in more orthodox words, damnation. . . Your prophecy, my dear friend, has not become history as yet. I have no resentment of animosity against the gentleman [Jefferson] and abhor the idea of blackening his character or transmitting him in odious colors to posterity. But I write with difficulty and am afraid of diffusing myself in too many correspondences. If I should receive a letter from him, however, I should not fail to acknowledge and answer it.� Rush encouraged the two men to write each other and finally in 1813 the two men were once again having friendly correspondence between each other that continued until their deaths. If someone says, �I love God,� but hates a Christian brother or sister, that person is a liar; for if we don�t love people we can see, how can we love God, whom we cannot see? The two men found the love for their friendship once again because of their love for God. They acknowledged their differences of opinion and found a renewed appreciation for one another.